TEMPO
Uber pledges to prevent sexual assault, domestic violence

Photo courtesy of Instagram user galadies.

Uber takes a stance against sexual and domestic violence.

BY KATE O'HAGAN

Sexual and domestic misconduct doesn’t only take place in Hollywood. In fact, Uber has pledged $5 million in an effort to prevent sexual assault and domestic violence.

 

On Nov. 6, Uber announced it will give $5 million over the next five years to fund programs inside and outside of the tech company. The funding will go toward prevention initiative programs, educational resources about sexual and domestic violence to drivers and riders and implementing employee education and training.

 

Uber hopes to combine its knowledge of transportation and technology with partner organizations that specialize in preventing sexual and domestic violence.

 

“Sexual assault and domestic violence are issues that affect millions of people around the world. As members of the communities we serve, we want to work with others to be part of the solution,” Vice President of Uber U.S. and Canada Operations Rachel Holt said to Huffington Post.

 

 “We’re not only committing major funding for awareness and prevention programs through leading community partners, we are driving meaningful change in this area from the highest levels of our organization on down.”

 

A bulk of the funding will go to Uber partners that work in anti-sexual and anti-domestic violence fields in order to create awareness and prevention programs. Uber’s partners include Raliance, the National Network to End Domestic Violence, NO MORE, Women of Color Network, Inc., Casa de Esperanza, the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs and A CALL TO MEN.

 

Besides their community preventions, Uber is using the pledge to focus on the culture of sexual harassment within its own company.

 

Uber is currently facing a class action lawsuit from multiple U.S. riders alleging assault from drivers. Also, more than 20 Uber employees were fired due to allegations of sexual harassment in June. Uber Founder, Travis Kalanick, resigned a few days later.

 

Since the switch in leadership earlier this year, Uber has already implemented multiple internal changes in hopes of improving its corrupted culture. The company created an executive leadership training program which educates teams how to handle issues of sexual harassment and assault in the workplace.

 

“From having honest conversations with experts who are on the front lines tirelessly raising awareness of sexual assault and domestic violence every day, to asking ourselves some important questions. How we can best use our resources?” Tracey Breeden, Uber’s Global Safety Communications Lead, wrote in a blog on Uber’s website.

 

“As a result of this ongoing collaboration we have begun to make important changes internally and will commit to use Uber’s scope and visibility to help drive awareness, education and prevention of sexual assault and domestic violence to millions globally.”

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